Meetinghouses of early New England by Peter Benes

Cover of: Meetinghouses of early New England | Peter Benes

Published by University of Massachusetts Press in Amherst .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Public buildings,
  • History,
  • Wooden churches,
  • Vernacular architecture,
  • Church history

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

StatementPeter Benes
Classifications
LC ClassificationsNA4210 .B46 2012
The Physical Object
Paginationpages cm
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25140093M
ISBN 109781558499102
LC Control Number2011050380

Download Meetinghouses of early New England

Today few of these once ubiquitous buildings survive. Based on site visits and meticulous documentary research, Meetinghouses of Early New England identifies more than 2, houses of worship in the region during the period from tobringing many of.

"Peter Benes's Meetinghouses of Early New England is a major publication, an orderly assembly of data from years of research among many hundreds of town records, town histories, and nearly every other source that anyone has heard of.

It covers the field as no other book has attempted and was clearly meant to be the standard reference book on this subject for by: 2. "Peter Benes's Meetinghouses of Early New England is a major publication, an orderly assembly of data from years of research among many hundreds of town records, town histories, and nearly every other source that anyone has heard of.

It covers the field as no other book has attempted and was clearly meant to be the standard reference book on this subject. Meetinghouses of Early New England book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. The definitive study of a hallmark of early American ve /5.

Book Description: Built primarily for public religious exercises, New England’s woodframe meetinghouses nevertheless were closely wedded to the social and cultural fabric of the neighborhood and fulfilled multiple secular purposes for much of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Meetinghouses of Early New England identifies more than. A book for both readers of history and lovers of historic architecture and fine black & white photography, this book combines Paul Wainwright’s elegant large-format photographs with an essay by noted colonial historian Peter Benes that showcases the beauty and history of the few remaining Colonial Meetinghouses in New England.

Get this from a library. Meetinghouse & church in early New England. [Edmund W Sinnott] -- Checklist of New England meetinghouses and churches built by and still standing. Meetinghouses of early New England.

[Peter Benes] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Peter Benes. Find more information about: Meetinghouses of the Seventeenth-Century -- 6. Meetinghouses of the Eighteenth-Century -- 7.

Meetinghouses of the Early Nineteenth-Century -- pt. III. CONCLUSIONS -- Meetinghouses of early New England book. Some Theoretical Models -- 9. Meetinghouse. Meetinghouses of Early New England. By Peter Benes. (Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, Pp. viii, $) Perhaps the most unexpected conclusion of folklorist Peter Benes in this meticulously researched compendium of information on the meetinghouses of New England is that the buildings that served the worship purposes of the.

Few substantial changes have been made to this piece of early American history, a claim shared with many other New England Meetinghouses. Pelham, Massachusetts () Built inthe Pelham Town Hall is the oldest town hall in continuous use in the United States.

"Peter Benes's Meetinghouses of Early New England is a major publication, an orderly assembly of data from years of research among many hundreds of town records, town histories, and nearly every other source that anyone has heard of.

It covers the field as no other book has attempted and was clearly meant to be the standard reference book on Author: Peter Benes.

Sinnott, Edmund W.: Meetinghouse and Church in Early New England. Bonanza Books, New York, A very complete reference to all colonial meetinghouses in the New England states. Contains photos and historical facts about many of them, and a complete index, by state, that identifies them by current architectural style.

Benes, Peter, Ed. The only small glitch is the absence of meetinghouses which were outside the mainstream of New England Congregationalism, such as the Quakers and the Shakers. I most assuredly recommend this book for all who have an interest in meetinghouses and in New England orthodox Christianity in the early centuries.5/5(2).

The origin of the town meeting form of government, still prevalent in New England today, can be traced to meetinghouses of the colonies. The practice of supporting the church with tax money continued until aboutwhen individual states passed laws separating church and state.

1 Peter Benes, Meetinghouses of Early New England Complete Bibliography Abernathy, Leslie C., and Stephen M. Horvath. Ye Meeting House at Palmer’s River, − Rehoboth, Mass.: Rehoboth Revolutionary War Bicentennial Commission, Author: Peter Benes. Meetinghouses of Early New England Benes, Peter Published by University of Massachusetts Press Benes, Peter.

Meetinghouses of Early New England. In colonial New England, there was little distinction between faith and community. Meetinghouses were built by the communities, usually but not always through taxation, and these were used for both religious worship and town business.

They were the central focus of the community, and were an important point of contact for all. Informative article. Thank you. Two additional resources definitely not to miss, if one is interested in learning more about early Puritan meeting houses and worship are: Meetinghouses of Early New England, by Peter Benes (University of Massachusetts Press, ).

This book is a wonderful and comprehensive resource on its subject. Along with gallery showings and his forthcoming book, A Space for Faith: The Colonial Meetinghouses of New England, scheduled for release by Peter E.

Randall Publisher inWainwright hopes his work will generate the interest these buildings deserve. “One reason for good art’s existence is to educate or teach or motivate people,” he says.

About this Item: McGraw-Hill, New York, Hard Cover. Condition: Near Fine. First Edition. In this beautiful and profucely illustrated volume, the author describes the character and history of some two hundred of the most interesting and important of the meetinghouses and churches built during the first centuries after the settlement of New England.

The early Puritan houses of worship in New England served also as meetinghouses, explains Mallary (Houses of New England); the transition from. Peter Benes has 14 books on Goodreads with 67 ratings. Peter Benes’s most popular book is A Space for Faith: The Colonial Meeting Houses of New England.

Any New England town that was founded in the s to ’s will do, and there are many off the beaten path to be discovered. For me, the quieter a cemetery is while you explore it, the better. Once you locate your older town, look for the historic center of it. Many believe old New England graveyards must be next to old New England churches.

Photographer Paul Wainwright has been recording New England meetinghouses with large-format black-and-white photography sincecapturing their dual functions of church and town hall — and preserving the sense of history within their spaces. His book, A Space For Faith: The Colonial Meetinghouses of New England, is scheduled for release by Peter E.

Randall Publisher in Supplemental material for Meetinghouses of Early New England is included here. For more information or to order the book, please visit the UMass Press Website. Follow. Submissions from PDF. Meetinghouses of Early New England Appendixes B–G.

The present Meeting House was built inreplacing an older structure located just to the northwest, across Hartford Road. Under the close church-state relationship that formed colonial New England, it was the responsibility of Brooklyn's taxpayers to erect a meeting house where the parish could gather on Sunday.

Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum, by Stuart M. Frank, is the winner of the nineteenth annual Historic New England Booksenior curator at the New Bedford Whaling Museum, uses the museum’s collection of scrimshaw—the world’s largest—as a means of examining the city’s.

Meetinghouses of Early New England, by Peter Benes, was named to Choice magazine's annual list of "Outstanding Academic Titles." This list includes just 9 percent of the titles reviewed by Choice during the past year, and less than 3 percent of the more t titles submitted for review during the same ghouses of Early New England also received the.

Historic New England’s Book Prize is awarded annually to a book that advances the understanding of life in New England from the past to today by examining its architecture, landscape, and material culture.

This also includes works in the decorative arts, archaeology, historic preservation, the history of photography, and other related subjects. When built in the s, Colonial meetinghouses were the focus of both religious and civic life – concepts not at all separate in Colonial New England.

Many were built with tax money, and their simple, undecorated architecture reflected the desire of early Puritan settlers to live simple lives apart from the Church of : Lois Powers. The University of Chicago Press.

Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center. New England is known for its long tradition of independence and self-governance, and an historic emblem of these traits are the New England Meeting Houses. The austere style and practical usage of these buildings remains a perfect reflection of the religion and temperament of the early Puritan settlers who built them.

White on White: Churches of Rural New England. October 5, - Janu Benes' new book, Meetinghouses of Early New England, is the definitive study of this hallmark of early American vernacular architecture. A book signing and light reception follows the presentation.

The lecture will take place at the First Congregational. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Meetinghouses of Early New England by Peter Benes (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at. The New England Preschool was organized in It continues to be a successful and vital program where “learning through play” is the foundation of the program.

With a new long-range plan in place, New England Church looks forward to a vital and exciting future as we seek to be “a caring church for thinking people” in the 21st century. Earle, Alice Morse: The Sabbath in Puritan New England.

Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, No ISBN, but may be available via web-based used book sellers. Mallary, Peter T., and Imrie, Tim: New England Churches and Meetinghouses: Chartwell Books, Secaucus, NJ, ISBN Sinnott, Edmund W.: Meetinghouse and Church.

Peter Benes. Peter Benes is director of the Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife in affiliation with Historic Deerfield, Inc., in Deerfield, Massachusetts. His previous books include Meetinghouses of Early New England (University of Massachusetts Press, ), winner of the Abbott Lowell Cummings Prize of the Vernacular Architecture Forum.

Early Connecticut Meetinghouses: Being an Account of the Church Edifices Built before Based Chiefly upon Town and Parish Records Author Kelly, J. Frederick Format/binding Hardcover Book condition Used - Collectible - Very Good Jacket condition N/A Binding Hardcover Publisher Columbia University Press Place of Publication New York Date.

book will be the exemplar for work in this area for a long time to come. Meetinghouses of early new england un-folds over ten chapters organized into three sections: “Background,” “Architecture,” and “conclusions.” While all of the chapters are. Wainwright turned his love for black and white photography into a new career.

Jennifer Crompton met with him recently and takes us inside the pages of his new book "A Space for Faith - The Colonial Meetinghouses of New England" Watch the Show (about 7 minutes) on WCSH Channel 6 in Portland, Maine.

The colonial meeting house in America was typically the first public building built as new villages sprang up. A meeting-house had a dual purpose as a place of worship and for public discourse, but sometimes only for " the service of God." As the towns grew and the separation of church and state in the United States matured the buildings which were used as the seat of local .Meetinghouses of New England.” He presented his photos and some of what he’s 9/24/ Importance of colonial meetinghouses discussed in Belmont - By TIM CAMERATO - Laconia Citizen Importance of colonial meetinghouses discussed in Belmont Southwick students connect with children worldwide File Size: KB.PETER BENES, Meetinghouses of Early New England.

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